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Bachelors in Business vs Associates in Information Technology


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#1 dexinthecity

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 03:38 PM

Okay so before I get into the nitty gritty here's a little background about me. I'm 25 years old, after high school I joined the Marine Corps did 4 years and got out to start going to school. I got out in 2009 and since then I've been on the path to getting a Bachelors in Business. I will be at the end of that path next winter. Right now I'm a full time student working for AT&T as a Uverse Technician. I meet a lot of people in my job, Uverse Technicians(Premises Technician) are essentially the face of AT&T.

The other day I met someone that works for a company called Mandiant (information security company) and we got to talking about the IT world, how he got where he is now. I've always had a keen interest in IT. We had a good conversation about it and it totally had me thinking twice about my educational path.

Now as mentioned before I'm a little over half way with my Bachelors in Business but I was thinking of switching over to Information Technology and just getting an Associates and working on my certifications in the IT world and eventually getting a Bachelors in IT.

OR I can keep on track with my BA in Business and at the same time take side classes to get an Associates in Information Technology since I've already got all my general education courses done and would just need to take the core classes for IT and at the same time work on getting some certifications.

Would like your opinion on what path should I take?

#2 crackerjoe69

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 03:49 PM

Most likely very little of your business credits will count towards an IT degree, unless it's a BA program.

Do what you enjoy. Many students start with one degree path and find out that it's just not what they like. If you like IT, then study it. Personally I'd get a BS, much more interesting to me. But I'm a math and science geek.

Looking at job postings though I often find that a BS in an engineering field is requested for IT jobs, not a BA. I guess it depends on your motivation, if you want to get into management, then a business degree would be pretty good.
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#3 dexinthecity

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 04:00 PM

View Postcrackerjoe69, on 26 January 2013 - 03:49 PM, said:

Most likely very little of your business credits will count towards an IT degree, unless it's a BA program.

Do what you enjoy. Many students start with one degree path and find out that it's just not what they like. If you like IT, then study it. Personally I'd get a BS, much more interesting to me. But I'm a math and science geek.

Looking at job postings though I often find that a BS in an engineering field is requested for IT jobs, not a BA. I guess it depends on your motivation, if you want to get into management, then a business degree would be pretty good.

In terms of getting an entry level job in the IT world just to get my foot in the door what are the requirements companies usually look for?

#4 crackerjoe69

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 04:02 PM

Well the economy sucks, so most of the time they want a full 4 year degree. Sometimes Military counts as a degree, depends on the company. What did you do in the Marines?
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#5 dexinthecity

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 04:04 PM

View Postcrackerjoe69, on 26 January 2013 - 04:02 PM, said:

Well the economy sucks, so most of the time they want a full 4 year degree. Sometimes Military counts as a degree, depends on the company. What did you do in the Marines?

Combat Engineer - demolitions and construction

#6 crackerjoe69

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 04:13 PM

"You go out and find mines" ;) Probably won't help getting an IT job I guess, but they do like the military experience.

I've also found that a some of the 100/200 level IT classes are structured around particular certifications. As such, you could skip the middle man and just buy the book yourself and study for the certs. The thing about certs is that they are easy to cheat. So having a cert doesn't really ensure a job. It's much more difficult to cheat in a degree, which is why so many employers require them. But doing the certification route is certainly an option.
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#7 wimwam

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 12:38 PM

From what I have seen in the job market you can get an entry level job with some certs like the MCSE or CCNA but you will likely end up working a helpdesk for a number of years waiting to get your break and move to a better job. If you get a computer science degree and focus on programing you can bypass the helpdesk track. Not saying this is written in stone, but just what I have seen in the marketplace...

#8 bluemoldycheeze

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:35 PM

I'd recommend checking out WGU.edu and getting a BS in Information Technology. I wouldn't bother with an associates. You also get some certifications with the degree from WGU.edu.




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