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HermanToothrot

vMX full public release

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This is less an offer, and more of an informational post.

 

Juniper offers a 60 day trial version of the full vMX release on their site

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. There's also a good set up guide on

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.

 

There's a caveat here, though. Last I checked, it runs on Ubuntu with KVM. And honestly, I would run this on a dedicated server (or a beefy Ubuntu VM) for evaluation purposes. Since it uses two VMs to act as a single "instance", you'll need some pretty hefty system resources available:

 

5 cores for the the VMs (1 vCPU for the VCP, and 4 for the VFP)

8GB RAM (2 GB for VCP, 6 GB for VFP)

 

The network interfaces only use virtio-net.

 

Personally, I'd run this either in a dedicated Ubuntu VM, or on a dedicated Server with multiple high-speed NICs. I tried running 2 "instances" in an Ubuntu VM concurrently, and 1 would always hang.

 

That's great, is every feature appears to work, plus Juniper with give you a license to purchase, so you don't have to re-install the vMX router, without having to recreate it.

 

If you want to play with vMX devices in a GNS3 topology, you can use the leaked 14.1R1.10,14.1R3.5, or 14.1R4.8 releases via Qemu+KVM, and only need to use 2GB of RAM per instance. Some of the releases DO need the following, to enable the PICs:

 

Verify you need this first:

show chassis fpc pic-status (if PIC 0 is missing,or says Offline, you'll need this)

show interfaces ge-* terse (if ge-* intefaces missing, you need this)

 

fix it with:

 

[email protected]% echo 'vm_local_rpio="1"' >> /boot/loader.conf

[email protected]% grep vm_ /boot/loader.comf

vm_local_rpio="1" <-- if done correctly, grep should return this.

 

save, and reboot the VM. Give it a few minutes after the VM boots, and it should come online, and you'll be good to go.

 

Also, if you're using this in GNS3, the interfaces match a little differently:

 

Eth0 = internal

Eth1 = internal

Eth2 = ge-0/0/0

Eth3 = ge-0/0/1

Eth4 = ge-0/0/2

Eth5 = ge-0/0/3

etc...

 

Hope this helps!

Edited by HermanToothrot
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Do you know if there is a way to convert the file to OVA image?

 

I do not believe that it's available yet (Ubuntu and KVM is the only supported platform at the moment), but I've heard that it will be offered for different platforms down the line.

 

You could potentially created an Ubuntu VM with vMX already installed, and convert that to an .ova. You'd likely want to run it on a hefty Esxi server with multiple highspeed NICs, though.

Edited by HermanToothrot

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BTW, if someone needs me to upload the engineering versions that work with GNS3 to Mega, or something, let me know. Those only require 2GB RAM, as opposed to 8, and multiple instances can be used in the same topology. Not true with the public release.

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BTW, if someone needs me to upload the engineering versions that work with GNS3 to Mega, or something, let me know. Those only require 2GB RAM, as opposed to 8, and multiple instances can be used in the same topology. Not true with the public release.

 

Hey HermanToothrot could you please provide this engineering version? 8GB of RAM is a good for a production environment, but is high requirement for lab use. I just want to check features without a production traffic on it.

Thanks!

Edited by nu11

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Public vMX 14.1R5 release -

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Public vMX 15.1F3.11 release -

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Juniper Documentation 1 -

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Juniper Documentation 2 -

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Blog post better than Juniper Docs -

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Leaked releases that work great with GNS3:

vMX 14.1R1.10 -

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vMX 14.1R3,5 -

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vMX 14.1R4.8 -

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(you need to use the rpio hack for 1R3.5 and 1R4.8 (method listed in my first post in this thread)

 

No clue what these do:

vMX14.2-MPC2-vm-01.rar -

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vMX14.2-RE0-vm-01.rar -

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(If anyone can tell me what these do, that would be awesome)

 

All Mega links should include decryption key. If they go fubar, let me know, and I'll post the file links, and decryption keys separately.

 

 

*EDIT*

 

I included the 15.1F3.11 vMX, as well.

 

*EDIT 2*

 

Forgot to hide the links. Corrected.

 

*EDIT 3* Updated link to v14.1R4.8

Edited by HermanToothrot
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BTW, with the leaked versions, use them as Qemu VMs in GNS3 (best with Linux), assign them 2GB of RAM, at least 4 interfaces (since we can't use Eth0 or Eth1), and enable -nographic -enable-kvm.

 

If you aren't using GNS3 in Linux, you can either use the new GNS3-VM (will release with v1.4), or there's a thread in the forum about using these with VMware, but I've never done that, so I don't know the steps.

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No clue what these do:

vMX14.2-MPC2-vm-01.rar -

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vMX14.2-RE0-vm-01.rar -

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There are two QEMU images which I use in GNS3 to have a full working vMX, someone explained it how it works here:

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Good luck.

Edited by xsimio
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There are two QEMU images which I use in GNS3 to have a full working vMX, someone explained it how it works here:

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Good luck.

 

So they're the same as the public release? That also uses two VMs to create a single "instance". Maybe they're newer code?

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vMX14.2 should be leak, not public release. public release have 15.1F3.11 and 14.1R5.4.

 

"you need to use the rpio hack for 1R3.5 and 1R4.8" what is means ?

 

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Huh. Didn't know the public release was up to 15.1, nor that the leaked version was 14.2. Thanks! :)

 

"you need to use the rpio hack for 1R3.5 and 1R4.8" what is means ?

 

Oh, that means that with the leaked 1R3.5 and 1R4.8 releases (by default), "show chassis fpc pic-status" doesn't show PIC 0 as Online, so the ge-* interfaces never come up. (This isn't the case with 1R1.10)

 

I don't recall if I enabled that "hack" on those files before I uploaded them, but to correct the issue, just use that method I mentioned in the previous post. What I do to make the changes persistent, is to fire up the VM outside GNS3 via Qemu, like this: "qemu-system-x86_64 -hda <file_name> -m 2048M -enable-kvm" , make the change I mentioned, commit and shut down the image, then import that image into GNS3 as a baseline vMX image.

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Herman,

 

The images vMX14.2-RE0 and vMX14.2-MPC2 allow you to build a distributed vMX router by splitting the control plane (RE) and the data plane between two hypervisors, consequently between two different physical machines. So I'm guessing the vMX performance numbers stated by Juniper come from a distributed deployment.

Edited by jeges

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Herman,

 

The images vMX14.2-RE0 and vMX14.2-MPC2 allow you to build a distributed vMX router by splitting the control plane (RE) and the data plane between two hypervisors, consequently between two different physical machines. So I'm guessing the vMX performance numbers stated by Juniper come from a distributed deployment.

 

 

OH! Very cool! That would definitely come in handy in certain applications. Thanks for the info! :biggrin:

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